From 1909 to the present day.

Introduction What's Vierdaagse? History 1909-1958 1959-1976 From 1977 1-39 years From 1977 40+ years Miniatures Orderly Medal Group Medal Aniversary Awards Other Civilian Awards World War II Sources/Links Vierdaagse Cross Contact Group Medal 1977, Close up 1948 March (zdetail) Silver & Gold Medal Youth Medals Replacement Medals Other Military Awards Nijmegen History 1940-45 Non Dutch Awards

Medals of the Nijmegen Vierdaagse.

From 1909 to the present day.

British Participation

Vierdaagse Cross 1909 - 1958.

With only very minor variations, the design of the cross was consistent throughout this period.  From 1959 the letters on the arms changed from NBVLO to KNBLO to reflect the bestowal of the title ‘Royal’ (Koninklijke) the previous year.

All crosses were made by Koninklijke Begeer of the South Holland town of Voorschoten.

Post war 1 year Cross Post war 1 year Cross (R) Post war 2 year Cross Post war 2 year Cross (R) Post war 5 year Cross Post war 5 year Cross (R) Post war 6 year Cross Post war 6 year Cross (R) Pre war 1 year gilt  Cross (plain) Pre war 1 year gilt Cross (plain) (R) Pre war 2 year gilt (stamp) Pre war 2 year gilt (stamp) (R) Pre war 5 year (plain) Pre war 5 year (plain) (R) Pre war 6 year Cross (plain) Pre war 6 year Cross (plain) (R)

Awarded without a crown for the fifth sucessful march.  For the sixth year a separate silver crown was awarded for attachment to the suspension of the five year cross.

Made of solid silver.  Most are hallmarked with a dagger silver hallmark [].  This is normally on the front of the cross, immediately below the suspension ball, often obscured if the crown for a sixth march is attached.  Some however are hallmarked on the top arm, on the silver border above the 'N'.

Obverse. As shown. The blue enamel is slightly lighter in pre-war medals, compared with awards from 1946.

Reverse. Prior to 1940, this was plain.  Many crosses were stamped with the maker’s name ‘Kon Begeer Voorschoten’.  

 

Ribbon numbers. Silver numerals were attached to the ribbon for a seventh; eighth or ninth successful march.

 

Prior to 1918 the silver cross was awarded for the third successful march.  Given the small number taking part in the early days, and as no marches took place in 1914 or 1915, very few silver crosses were ever awarded for a third march.

Bronze Cross: first and second successful march.

Bronze Cross: not gilded.  Identical to the gilded version, but of plain bronze.

Awarded in the early years of the Marches to those who completed the event, but did not meet the full requirements as laid down in the Regulations. This includes soldiers who marched the full 55 km route but without full pack and, by 1918, to civilian men who completed one of the optional shorter routes.  Initially at least, women who walked their regulation distance of 40km also received the ungilded cross.

 

Soldiers walking the regulation military distance with full backpack and, from 1910, civilians who walked the full 55 km distance, received the gilt cross.

 

The regulations were later changed so that walkers who completed a route that was less than their required regulation distance received a certificate only, and no medal.

These are examples of the award from 1946.  While the obverse remains the same, all bronze medals were now struck with a roundel at the centre of the reverse, bearing the inscription ‘Kon Begeer Voorschoten’.  

Made of gilded bronze.  Awarded without a crown for the first sucessful march.  For the second year a separate gilded bronze crown was awarded for attachment to the suspension of the first year cross.

Obverse. As shown, although there were minor variations in the style of the letters on the arms of the cross.

Reverse. Prior to 1940, this was plain.  Many crosses were stamped with the maker’s name ‘Kon Begeer Voorschoten’.  

 

Ribbon numbers. Bronze gilt numbers were attached to the ribbon for a third and fourth successful march.

Gold Cross: tenth and eleventh successful march.

Silver Cross: fifth and sixth successful march.

These examples were awarded from 1946.  The obverse remains the same, although the enamel is very slightly darker.  From 1946 all silver medals were struck with a roundel at the centre of the reverse, bearing the inscription ‘Kon Begeer Voorschoten’.

1909-1958, Gold Cross

These medals are dealt with on a separate page:

Cross from the first March in bronze gilt.  

This cross, engraved on reverse upper arm with the year of the first march (1909), confirms that the broad design of the cross has remained the same over the years.

The cross has no maker's mark and is stamped 'BRONS' on the reverse.

The central shield has been manufactured separately and attached to the cross, a feature of crosses from the early marches.  

(With thanks to Gerrit Van Weeghel for supplying the photographs).

In 1909 the cross was awarded in bronze gilt to soldiers who completed the regulation 55 kms a day with full kit, and bronze for soldiers who marched without full pack.

Civilians who completed the 35km a day route received the existing NBvLO prize bronze medal, with a suitable inscription (see 'Other civilian awards' page for photo).

1909 cross (R) 1909 cross Pre war Bronze (plain) Pre war Bronze 2(plain) (R)